Finally getting some work done on something

It wasn’t much, but it took a while to do and then more time to photograph. I did some experiments with the nippers and building junctions where tubes intersect on the real frame to see how close I could come to IRL appearances with the tools and materials I have.

The one to look at here is the one with the vertical sticking up on the far right

The one we are looking at here is the one I did first with the non-flush side of the nippers, where I failed utterly in getting a smooth junction. That is the one that is on the right side of the picture, the gaps are huge.

Again on the right, with the junction made from the flush side cut

Again the junction in question is on the right side of the picture, this time the smooth side of the cut from the flush cutting side of the nippers. This is a much smoother junction than the other cut but still has undesirably large gaps. This is a very simple to construct junction compared to the first junction. Just do the flush side towards the work piece when making the cut and stick it in there facing the junction.

This was two 45° angle cuts facing each other and the vertical member on top and on the right side of the image again

This time I cut the flush side towards the work piece at a 45° angle and put those together like a mitered joint and glued the vertical on top. This was the smoothest junction yet, but there are still some large gaps showing. I have one more junction to do before moving to other cutting methods, the 45° like the mitered joint but against the vertical instead of under it. I’m cutting and gluing that joint between sentences of composing this post. And I’ll post the picture in this post tonight if I can.

Looks pretty good from the outside

Focus problems but you can still see the large gap on the back side.

This is almost as clean on the mitered joint on the outside but there is still a huge gap on the inside because the geometry just doesn’t work to join round stock with straight cuts. The mitered joint with the vertical member on top was the best so far as gaps and other fitment issues are concerned, but still not even close to what can be seen in the real 1:1 world. Basically I need to use rounded cutting tools like files or sanding sticks to make the joint fit like it does in the 1:1 version.

So the next step is to use the miniature files I bought a few years ago for this project to cut some “copes” in the stock to get better looking joints. Or just call it an engineering model instead of a display model, and don’t worry about the appearance. The lengths of the members would be outside to outside, or inside to inside depending on the orientation of the joint and would be made with the flush cut side of the nippers against the work.

What do you think?

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