Tag Archives: display models

More parts arrived

The parts I bought this January finally arrived today. The backgrounds are the business cards for the company I bought the parts from, to give you an idea of scale for these parts, and I’m using “scale” in two forms for this. The parts are for the Mini Sprint-T in 1/25 scale.

Rod ends in 1/25 scale, the color is because there was a brass lamp bouncing light from the camera flash

The seat in scale. This is actually much nicer than the actual seat in the car that I showed a few weeks ago, but if I had the $ this is exactly the seat I would install

Again, the backgrounds in the picture, the dark part, is the business card of the company that I bought these from. They literally get lost on a standard size business card. And there was a note inside the delivery envelope saying the guy that runs the whole show for this company just got out of the hospital after 2 months. And those thin pins coming off the top row of rod ends fit snugly in the stainless steel tubes I bought to make the links for the 4-link, and the plan is to add a tiny drop of solder to the end of the tube to hold the rod end and jam nut in place. The jam nuts are those hex-shaped things above the rod ends.

And I need to get to bed, so the blog post needs to, too.

Advertisements

I found the files

And I used one to make copes in the rod I’m using to represent the tubes of the frame. I need more practice, but I got one that fit well and looks almost like the 1:1 Sprint-T will look when completed. Now the 1:1 car will use tubes of different wall thickness for areas of the frame that are loaded more or less with the wall thickness adjusted accordingly, but since they are all the same OD but different ID I use just the one size rod for everything on the frame. That is the same stuff I’m using for practice because I have tons of it, and I need to get those joints as close to perfect as possible.

This is the leg that had the cope that was better then the cope on the other side. The joint in question is the one on front and to the right of the picture.

Now the joint is in front and to the far left. You can see the fit of this side is not as tight as the other.

Not much to say except I used the back side of a triangular file to form the cope and the melting effect of solvent plastic cement finishes the actual cope when I force the joint together. Once I got it down it worked surprisingly well. The second try worked perfectly and also auto-aligns the joint to the center of the vertical member, or whatever orientation the coped rod is forced against.

In other news Mrs. the Poet’s new vacuum cleaner sucks, and that’s a good thing because that’s why we got rid of the old one that stopped sucking, sucking up the dirt. She made a test run and then did the entire house while I was doing my first search for the hand files. She is much happier to have a vacuum that sucks again.😁

Finally getting some work done on something

It wasn’t much, but it took a while to do and then more time to photograph. I did some experiments with the nippers and building junctions where tubes intersect on the real frame to see how close I could come to IRL appearances with the tools and materials I have.

The one to look at here is the one with the vertical sticking up on the far right

The one we are looking at here is the one I did first with the non-flush side of the nippers, where I failed utterly in getting a smooth junction. That is the one that is on the right side of the picture, the gaps are huge.

Again on the right, with the junction made from the flush side cut

Again the junction in question is on the right side of the picture, this time the smooth side of the cut from the flush cutting side of the nippers. This is a much smoother junction than the other cut but still has undesirably large gaps. This is a very simple to construct junction compared to the first junction. Just do the flush side towards the work piece when making the cut and stick it in there facing the junction.

This was two 45° angle cuts facing each other and the vertical member on top and on the right side of the image again

This time I cut the flush side towards the work piece at a 45° angle and put those together like a mitered joint and glued the vertical on top. This was the smoothest junction yet, but there are still some large gaps showing. I have one more junction to do before moving to other cutting methods, the 45° like the mitered joint but against the vertical instead of under it. I’m cutting and gluing that joint between sentences of composing this post. And I’ll post the picture in this post tonight if I can.

Looks pretty good from the outside

Focus problems but you can still see the large gap on the back side.

This is almost as clean on the mitered joint on the outside but there is still a huge gap on the inside because the geometry just doesn’t work to join round stock with straight cuts. The mitered joint with the vertical member on top was the best so far as gaps and other fitment issues are concerned, but still not even close to what can be seen in the real 1:1 world. Basically I need to use rounded cutting tools like files or sanding sticks to make the joint fit like it does in the 1:1 version.

So the next step is to use the miniature files I bought a few years ago for this project to cut some “copes” in the stock to get better looking joints. Or just call it an engineering model instead of a display model, and don’t worry about the appearance. The lengths of the members would be outside to outside, or inside to inside depending on the orientation of the joint and would be made with the flush cut side of the nippers against the work.

What do you think?